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“LEVEL”: THE ICONIC PARTY
WHERE EVERYONE SAW EYE TO EYE

Hans Hemmert, Level (1997) (via Kavi Gupta Gallery)

Hans Hemmert, Level (1997) (via Kavi Gupta Gallery)

Emerging during the vibrant 1990s, the Relational Aesthetics movement embodied a collective of visionary artists who embarked on a remarkable quest to foster connection and exchange between the artist and the beholder through immersive installations and interactive happenings. Rejecting the creation of traditional art objects, these relational artists chose to captivate audiences by constructing captivating scenarios that beckoned for interpersonal engagement.

One memorable instance occurred in 1997 when Hans Hemmert, a renowned Berlin-based artist celebrated for his balloon-centric works, orchestrated an extraordinary gathering. The event entailed guests adorning shoe-extenders, elevating everyone's stature to a uniform two meters in height. Through this whimsical act, the ordinary boundaries of physical disparities were transcended as participants found themselves united at a shared eye level. Crafted entirely from azure foam, the shoes ingeniously transformed each person's actual height into a visual uniformity emanating from the soles, akin to a mobile bar graph in motion. Dubbed "Level," this captivating project materialized as part of the Personal Absurdities exhibition hosted at Galerie Gebauer in Berlin.

The Relational Aesthetics movement, with its audacious vision and profound commitment to interactive art experiences, continues to inspire new artistic endeavors and redefine the boundaries of creative expression.

Hans Hemmert, Level (1997) (via Inges Idee)

Hans Hemmert, Level (1997) (via Inges Idee)

Nurtured amidst the idyllic landscapes of the Bavarian countryside, Hemmert's formative years were infused with a profound fascination for the tactile realm. It wasn't until he embarked on his philosophical journey in 1981 that he discovered the true essence of his artistic calling. Enlisting at the prestigious Akademie der Künste, he delved into the realm of sculpture, unearthing a newfound passion for the creation of tangible works. Eventually, his insatiable quest for artistic growth led him to venture to the vibrant city of London, where he sought enrollment at the esteemed Saint Martin's School of Art.

In the midst of his artistic sojourn, Hemmert found himself profoundly influenced by the captivating world of English sculpture. Imbued with the teachings of the revered Anthony Caro, a luminary whose steel creations had garnered widespread acclaim during the revolutionary '60s, Hemmert's artistic vision took shape. The amalgamation of his studies both in his homeland and in the bustling artistic hub of London served as fertile ground for his creative evolution, nurturing his burgeoning talent and molding him into the artist he would ultimately become.

‘Yellow sculpture fitting to beer crate’ 1998, Hans Hemmert
‘On the Road’ 1996, Hans Hemmert

‘On the Road’ 1996, Hans Hemmert

By Hans Hemmert, 1998

Initially captivated by the raw power of steel, Hemmert's artistic exploration took a fascinating turn as he found himself irresistibly drawn to the ethereal realm of air. Entranced by its weightlessness and cost-effectiveness, he embarked on a captivating journey, venturing beyond the confines of traditional materials. His artistic trajectory saw a captivating shift as he delved into the realm of inflatables, breathing life into his creations through rubber pool paraphernalia and playful children's toys. A defining moment arrived when Hemmert, driven by an unyielding desire for artistic autonomy, resolved to craft these whimsical objects himself, casting aside reliance on ready-made items. Tirelessly honing his craft, the artist now crafts his own latex balloons, immersing himself in meticulous research to uncover unique development techniques within the confines of his vibrant Berlin studio.

While his artistic pursuits often lead him on solitary paths of creation, Hemmert finds himself seamlessly intertwined within the vibrant tapestry of the German art collective known as Inges Idee. Established in 1992, this dynamic group, composed of Hemmert alongside Axel Lieber, Thomas Schmidt, and George Zey, operates collaboratively, breathing life into awe-inspiring art projects that grace public spaces. Together, they infuse their shared vision with collective energy, propelling their creations to transcend conventional boundaries and evoke profound reflections in the hearts and minds of all who encounter their artistic endeavors.

‘Sunday afternoon, at home in Neukölln’ 1995, Hans Hemmert
‘Yellow sculpture fitting to Julie’ 1998, Hans Hemmert

‘Sunday afternoon, at home in Neukölln’ 1995, Hans Hemmert

By Hans Hemmert, 1998

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